Legal Lasso: The DNC is Considering a Return to Denver

COMPILED BY LAW WEEK COLORADO’S NEWS STAFF

IN LOCAL NEWS:

DNC Considering Denver
The Democratic National Committee is considering eight cities for the 2020 convention, and, of course, Denver is on that list. Denver last hosted the convention in 2008.

Homeless Targeted by City Ordinances
A report from the University of Denver’s Sturm College of Law asserts many municipal ordinances in Colorado — including 15 laws in Denver — disproportionately target homeless populations. But the City of Denver has something to say about that claim.

Repercussions of Mental Health Bill
State officials worry they’re going to face fines with the death of a bill in the legislature that would have allowed them to treat mentally ill people in jail for up to five months before they are deemed to stand trial.

Ending Drilling in Longmont
Longmont City Council will hold a public question and answer forum on Tuesday about a proposed agreement that would essentially eliminate any oil and gas drilling within city limits if passed.

Where are the Pot Businesses?
After voters passed an initiative allowing social pot consumption licenses in Denver, the city braced for a flood of applications, but so far, only two business have sought those licenses. Now the city has a task force looking into why that is.

 

IN NATIONAL NEWS:

Searching Electronic Devices
The 4th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Wednesday that some form of “individualized suspicion” is required to seize electronics like phones and tablets for a forensic search.

Four More Murder Charges
The man suspected of being the Golden State Killer is now accused of four more murders, all of which occurred in Santa Barbara, California.

Preparing for a Midterm Shakeup
The Senate Judiciary Committee’s Republican chairman is urging any Supreme Court justice considering retirement to announce immediately so a successor can be confirmed before the November U.S. midterm election.

Patton Boggs Disavows Cohen
Squire Patton Boggs is seeking to distance itself from Michael Cohen, saying it has no knowledge of the payments that he received from corporate clients through a shell company.

And Greenberg Traurig Rejects Giuliani
Greenberg Traurig, the law firm that Rudy Giuliani formerly worked for, rejected his defense of a $130,000 payment that Michael Cohen made to adult film actress Stormy Daniels.

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